The NotABomb Review Rubric

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Recently, a product vendor was wondering how their product got a particular rating, not higher.  I tried to explain that to this blog, a rating of 3 is a really high rating, since it means that the product itself was “very good” on all three major counts. On most sites, 5 is “good” and 1 or 0 is “bad” and that’s sorta it. I have always wanted the notabomb ratings to mean a little something more than just good and bad products.

 

If you are one of my readers, supporters, benefactors, or accidental internet visitors,  you can expect that if I put it on this blog at all it is for one of a few reasons –  

 

One, I thought it was cool.  If I experience something or some product that is really cool and worth reading about it will be here. I put this blog up so you can see cool things to do, build, and go eat. If it’s here it’s for that reason first of all.

 

Two, from time to time I need to warn kids (and parents too) that a product or experience needs to be avoided.

 

Three lastly, if there was a company or place I really liked, I probably found some way to contact them.  If I am in contact with a company that I like and they invite me somewhere, or send me something, I will write about that.

 

If your product or place to go, or food got anything above a 2.5 that means the it was something I’d gladly spend my own money on, or if I purchased it for myself, would totally buy again.

 

But..  that is not really enough.  I think it’s time that notabomb explained exactly how it is that reviews happen with a set of rules that will make it really easy to follow, 3/5ths of the time.

 

This rubric is for better understanding for people who think that i gave it a too low or too high score you have to remember the way i rate products on this website is against other companies products on your website I would rate it against the rest of YOUR stuff

 

The first three points (or stars, or boots or whatevers) are technical. You can measure them. They are based on fair and objective things.

 

Product Quality : total possible points = 1

  1. Does it hold up well to handling, construction and use?
  2. Are the components solid?  Do they work?
  3. Are the wires, leads and other parts made from good metals? Do they fray?
  4. Are the markings clear?
  5. Does this product compare well to other products in the same category?

 

Product Function : total possible points = 1

  1. Did the lights blink the way they should
  2. If put together correctly, does it do the thing it is supposed to do?
  3. Did it function and then burn out quickly?
  4. Does it fill a need?
  5. Is it fun enough that it makes its own need?

 

Product Documentation : total possible points = 1

  1. Were the documents in standard notation?
  2. Were the values of each component clearly marked and easy to find?
  3. Was the documentation in enough languages?
  4. Were there web available extra documents?
  5. Are there forums or places to search where people give advice for this item?

 

So if your product earned 3, you’re at the top of your technical game and you are making a product I would buy for myself, or ask my parents for, or put on a list, or that kind of thing. Where do other points come from?

 

Then… the other two points you can earn aren’t really the fair or technical kind. Actually, anything that fails above can still make good points levels by being something that is “kid cool.”  Ever have a favorite toy that was really awful, and poorly constructed but for some unexplainable reason it was still one of your favorite things?  That thing can still earn two points here. 

 

How about food that really wasn’t SO good, but you were really hungry, or with a bunch of really close friends or family and then you still had a great time?  That can earn points here too. Kid blog. Kid points.

 

Is your product innovative? Imaginative?  Particularly shiny? All those things and a bajillion other things that distract or amuse me can easily earn points. I’m a New Yorker, so I get to see and do a lot of cool things all the time, but I still find things to like and do anywhere I go.

 

I promise never to let consideration or gift effect my reviews. I also promise to shamelessly seek out every consideration, freebie or gift opportunity that match the things I like to do.

 

Still confused? Ask questions.  I promise to answer, I don’t promise to unconfuse you.

 

 

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